Primary Care, Diabetes and Chronic Care

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Diabetes Self Management Education

Diabetes Self Management Education includes diet, exercise

Medical studies demonstrate that patients who participate in diabetes self-management education (DSME) programs are more likely to:

  • Use primary care and preventive services
  • Be more proactive in their care
  • Have delayed onset or escalation of diabetes
  • Take medications as prescribed
  • Have improved clinical outcomes, such as better control of their HBA1c levels, blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, and
  • Have lower health care related costs

DiamC has Double accreditation by the AADE and the ADA

DiamC is the only diabetes program in Louisiana with a program in diabetes self-management education (DSME) certified by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). These certifying organizations recognize DiamC for providing evidenced-based education and support services standards adopted by a national task force of experts in diabetes care and management.

In 2015, a Joint Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommended DSME be provided to all patients with Type 2 diabetes at these four critical times.

Four critical times to assess, provide, and adjust diabetes self-management education and support:

When primary care provider or specialist should consider referral:
1

At diagnosis

When primary care provider or specialist should consider referral:

  • Newly diagnosed. All newly diagnosed individuals with type 2 diabetes should receive DSME/S
  • Ensure that both nutrition and emotional health are appropriately addressed in education or make separate referrals
2

Annual assessment of education, nutrition, and emotional needs

When primary care provider or specialist should consider referral:

  • Needs review of knowledge, skills, and behaviors
  • Long-standing diabetes with limited prior education
  • Change in medication, activity, or nutritional intake
  • HbA1c out of target
  • Maintain positive health outcomes
  • Unexplained hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia
  • Planning pregnancy or pregnant
  • For support to attain and sustain behavior change(s)
  • Weight or other nutrition concerns
  • New life situations and competing demands
3

When new complicating factors influence self-management

When primary care provider or specialist should consider referral:

Change in:

  • Health conditions such as renal disease and stroke, need for steroid or complicated medication regimen
  • Physical limitations such as visual impairment, dexterity issues, movement restrictions
  • Emotional factors such as anxiety and clinical depression
  • Basic living needs such as access to food, financial limitations
4

When transitions in care occur

When primary care provider or specialist should consider referral:

Change in:

  • Living situation such as inpatient or outpatient rehabililtation or now living alone
  • Medical care team
  • Insurance coverage that results in treatment change
  • Age-related changes affectiving cognition, self-care, etc.